Orthopedic Surgery Cedarhurst
Orthopedic Surgery Cedarhurst
Orthopedic Surgery CedarhurstOrthopedic Surgery CedarhurstOrthopedic Surgery Cedarhurst

Our Services

Carpal Tunnel Release

Carpal tunnel release is an outpatient procedure performed to relieve pressure on the median nerve and reduce the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. This procedure can help restore muscle strength and dexterity, and is typically performed on patients who have had persistent symptoms that do not respond to conservative treatment methods.

Carpal tunnel release can be performed endoscopically or through an open procedure. Both types offer different advantages to the doctor and patient, and should be considered after a thorough evaluation of the patient's individual condition. Open carpal tunnel release involves a two inch incision in the middle of the palm and gives the surgeon a better view of the treated area with less risk of accidentally damaging nerve tissue. Endoscopic carpal tunnel release involves two tiny incisions and offers patients less post-operative pain and the ability to return to work more quickly.

Patients can return home the same day, but may need prescription pain medication at first to manage the pain from the procedure. The hand may be kept in a splint for the first few weeks after surgery in order to protect the wrist while it heals. Although patients may continue to experience carpal tunnel symptoms after this procedure, most report that symptoms are significantly reduced after carpal tunnel release.

Distal Clavicle Excision (Mumford Procedure)

A distal clavicle excision is a surgical procedure performed to relieve pain in the acromioclavicular (AC) joint, which often develops as a result of a fall or other type of trauma. AC injuries may cause the two bones to move or separate, or the ligaments to stretch or tear. While conservative treatments are often used as initial treatment, surgery is needed in many cases to restore the position of the clavicle and allow the patient to resume normal functioning.

This procedure can be performed through traditional open techniques or using arthroscopy, with which patients can benefit from smaller incisions and shorter recovery times. During the procedure, a small part of the clavicle is removed to create a space between the two bones, in addition to the removal of any bone spurs or damaged tissue around the joint.

A sling will likely be needed after surgery. Patients will need to undergo physical therapy after this procedure in order to restore movement and activity to the shoulder, once initial healing is complete.

Elbow Replacement

Elbow replacement is performed to repair severe damage within the elbow joint caused by osteoarthritis, fractures, tumors, tissue tears or other serious conditions. Patients with these conditions often experience pain, stiffness and an inability to use the arm during regular activity.

During the elbow replacement procedure, the damaged bone ends are removed from the joint and replaced with a prosthetic device that is held in place with bone cement and connected with a hinge. This procedure is performed under general anesthesia. Patients will need to undergo physical therapy after joint replacement in order to restore strength and stability to the joint before returning to physical activity.

Fracture Treatment

A fracture is a break or crack in a bone that occurs when the bone cannot withstand outside forces, often as a result of trauma or disease. Fracture, break and crack all refer to the same thing. Fractures can range from a small crack in the bone to complete separation. They are often caused by a fall, motor vehicle accident or sports injury. Normal activities can also cause fractures for people at a higher risk, including those with low bone density (osteoporosis), bone tumors, cancer or brittle bone disease (osteogenesis imperfecta).

Some of the different types of fractures include:

  • Stress Fracture - A stress fracture occurs as a result of overuse. Because of repeated use, the bone becomes weak and cannot absorb the shock that is put on it. It is common in the lower leg or foot and especially among athletes.
  • Compression Fracture - A compression fracture occurs as a result of old age. People with osteoporosis are at high risk for this type of fracture because their bones lose calcium. The weakened bones, usually in the spine, can crumple under the force of gravity.
  • Incomplete (Greenstick) Fracture - A greenstick fracture occurs when the bone bends but does not completely break. This occurs most often in children, who have high levels of calcium in their bones.
  • Comminuted Fracture - This occurs when the bone cracks into several fragments. It occurs as a result of high impact trauma or osteoporosis.

A bone fracture causes pain, swelling and sometimes bruising of the affected area. Applied weight or pressure causes even more severe pain. They are usually easy to diagnose, but treatment requires precision and care by experienced professionals.

At South Island Orthopaedic Group, we offer specialized knowledge and care for the treatment of fractures. Our doctors will treat your injury every step of the way until it is completely healed. Bone fractures can be diagnosed through a physical examination and an X-ray or CT scan. Immobilizing the area is often helpful in relieving pain before proper treatment begins. Treatment for bone fractures depends on the location and type of fracture, as well as the patient's medical history. We take all of these factors into account when developing a treatment plan.

Mild fractures, including stress and greenstick fractures, usually only require the conservative treatment methods of ice, rest and anti-inflammatory medication. Moderate fractures may require splints or braces along with pain medication. The immobilization helps relieve pain and speed up recovery. More severe fractures may require surgical treatment, especially open fractures with wounds that need to be closed.

After the proper treatment is performed, the rehabilitation process begins. It is important to care for your fracture while it heals. Full healing can take several weeks to several months. Your doctor will advise you on how to care for your fracture and helpful measures you can take to ensure a speedy and healthy recovery.

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