Orthopedic Surgery Cedarhurst
Orthopedic Surgery Cedarhurst
Orthopedic Surgery CedarhurstOrthopedic Surgery CedarhurstOrthopedic Surgery Cedarhurst

Our Services

Genzyme Carticel® Transplantation

Carticel® by Genzyme is a safe and effective treatment option for cartilage injuries ideal for patients whose condition has not responded to arthroscopic or open surgery procedures. Carticel is a form of autologous chrondocyte implantation (ACI), meaning that it uses the patient’s own cartilage cells to restore the damaged area and relieve pain and other symptoms.

Cartilage cells from a healthy area are removed from the body through a minimally invasive biopsy procedure and then harvested in our lab, which takes about three weeks. The processed cells are then implanted through an incision in the knee after any dead or damaged tissue is removed from the area. Harvested cells can be stored for up to two years, allowing surgery to be scheduled at the patient’s convenience.

After the Carticel transplant procedure, patients will likely experience pain that can be controlled with medication and will subside within a few days. Rehabilitation using a Continuous Passive Motion (CPM) machine will begin within 24 hours of the procedure to safely move the knee and encourage cartilage growth. A customized physical therapy program will be developed for each patient’s individual condition.

Knee Arthroscopy

Knee arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that allows doctors to examine tissues inside the knee. It is often performed to confirm a diagnosis made after a physical examination and other imaging tests such as an MRI, a CT scan or X-rays.

During knee arthroscopy, a thin fiberoptic light, magnifying lens and tiny television camera are inserted into the knee, allowing your doctor to examine the joint in great detail.

For some patients, it is then possible to treat the problem using a few additional instruments inserted through small incisions around the joint. Sports injuries are often repairable with arthroscopy. Knee injuries that are frequently treated using arthroscopic techniques include meniscal tears, mild arthritis, loose bone or cartilage, ACL and PCL tears, synovitis (swelling of the joint lining) and patellar (knee cap) misalignment.

Because it is minimally invasive, knee arthroscopy offers many benefits to the patient over traditional surgery. These include:

  • No cutting of muscles or tendons
  • Less bleeding during surgery
  • Less scarring
  • Smaller incisions
  • Faster recovery and return to regular activities
  • Faster and more comfortable rehabilitation

Knee arthroscopy is not appropriate for every patient. Your doctor will discuss which options are best for you.

Labral Repair

A labrum is a protective cuff of cartilage found in ball and socket joints like the hip and shoulder. They provide more stability, cushioning and a full range of motion for these shallow joints. A tear in the labrum, known as a labral tear, is caused by injury or overuse and can lead to pain and "catching" of the joint while moving.

While many labral tears can be treated by managing pain symptoms and undergoing physical therapy, some cases require surgical treatment. Labral repair surgery aims to repair unstable shoulders with staples, anchors or sutures. The procedure is usually performed through arthroscopy, which allows the doctor to view the tear through a small camera and perform the procedure through tiny incisions. Larger tears may require an open procedure.

Labral repair surgery is usually effective in treating labral tears and restoring full movement and strength. Recovery time depends on the type of procedure but usually takes several months.

Meniscus Repair

A torn meniscus is a common injury often caused by forcefully twisting or rotating the knee. It can also be a result of degenerative changes in older adults. A meniscus tear can be repaired through arthroscopic surgery.

The menisci are C-shaped pieces of tough cartilage that rest on either side of the knee, between the thigh bone and shin bone. They help to distribute body weight across the knee so it can be properly supported by the bones in the leg, and also provide stability to the knee joint. A meniscus tear is common after a traumatic injury, and most frequently occurs when the knee joint is bent and the knee is then twisted. Torn menisci are common in athletes and older adults whose cartilage may have worn away.

A torn meniscus causes pain and swelling, and may also be accompanied by a frequently locking joint and the inability to completely straighten the knee. Some people experience a popping or clicking sensation within the knee as well.

Treatment for a meniscus tear often begins with conservative methods such as rest, ice or over-the-counter medication. If these treatments are not effective and symptoms continue, you may benefit from meniscus repair surgery. Meniscus repair is an arthroscopic procedure in which the torn segment of the meniscus is removed and the torn edges are sutured together, which allows them to heal properly.

Recovery from meniscus repair surgery can take several months of immobilization and the use of crutches. Most patients recover well from this procedure and are able to return to their normal activities.

Page 3 of 6

1   |   2   |   3   |   4   |   5   |   6

back to top